JAPANESE VERSION: Rapid Electrical Stimulation and Intercellular Proteins

Following the introduction in English, this podcast interview is presented in Japanese. It is well known that rapid pacing of the heart causes calcium overload and myocardial cell damage in heart failure patients. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unknown. Listen as Associate Editor Masafumi Kitakaze interviews lead author Tomoko Ohkusa (Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine) and expert Motoaki Sano (Keio University School of Medicine) about the latest work by Nakashima et al, which explores rapid electrical stimulation and adhesion gap junctions in cardiomyocytes. Does beta-Catenin play an important role in the formation and stability of gap junctions? Could beta-Catenin signaling pathways form the basis of new cellular therapies to modulate intracellular junction remodeling? Listen to find out.


Tadamitsu Nakashima, Tomoko Ohkusa, Yoko Okamoto, Masaaki Yoshida, Jong-Kook Lee, Yoichi Mizukami, Masafumi Yano Rapid electrical stimulation causes alterations in cardiac intercellular junction proteins of cardiomyocytes Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published online Articles in Press March 7, 2014; published in May 1, 2014 issue. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00653.2013.

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ENGLISH VERSION: Rapid Electrical Stimulation and Intercellular Proteins

It is well known that rapid pacing of the heart causes calcium overload and myocardial cell damage in heart failure patients. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unknown. Listen as Associate Editor Masafumi Kitakaze interviews lead author Tomoko Ohkusa (Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine) and expert Motoaki Sano (Keio University School of Medicine) about the latest work by Nakashima et al, which explores rapid electrical stimulation and adhesion gap junctions in cardiomyocytes. Does beta-Catenin play an important role in the formation and stability of gap junctions? Could beta-Catenin signaling pathways form the basis of new cellular therapies to modulate intracellular junction remodeling? Listen to find out.


Tadamitsu Nakashima, Tomoko Ohkusa, Yoko Okamoto, Masaaki Yoshida, Jong-Kook Lee, Yoichi Mizukami, Masafumi Yano Rapid electrical stimulation causes alterations in cardiac intercellular junction proteins of cardiomyocytes Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published online Articles in Press March 7, 2014; published in May 1, 2014 issue. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00653.2013.

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Aerobic Exercise Acutely Prevents Endothelial Dysfunction

Can exercise protect us from the deleterious effects of mental stress? Yes, according to new research by Sales et al. Listen as Associate Editor Nancy Kanagy interviews lead author Antonio Nobrega (Fluminense Federal University, Brazil) and expert David Poole (Kansas State University) about this fascinating new research into how just 40 minutes of exercise can prevent or reverse the loss of endothelial function due to mental stress in patients with metabolic syndrome. Should we all invest in a treadmill for the office? Listen and find out.


Allan R. K. Sales, Igor A. Fernandes, Natalia G. Rocha, Lucas S. Costa, Helena N. M. Rocha, Joao D. M. Mattos, Lauro C. Vianna, Bruno M. Silva, Antonio C. L. Nobrega Aerobic exercise acutely prevents the endothelial dysfunction induced by mental stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome: the role of shear rate Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published online February 15, 2014. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00811.2013.

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Oxidative Stress and Cutaneous Local Heating in Young Smokers

We know smoking is bad for us, but can endothelial dysfunction in smokers be repaired, or even restored? Listen as Editor in Chief Dr. Irving H. Zucker interviews lead author Christopher Minson (University of Oregon) and expert Lacy Alexander (The Pennsylvania State University) about the work by Minson and colleagues which used the skin as a model for microvascular changes in smokers, which can indicate dysfunction earlier on in the progression of disease than macrocirculatory changes. Is nitric oxide a major player in the skin’s vasodilator response to a local cutaneous heat stressor? Listen now.


Naoto Fujii, Vienna E. Brunt, Christopher Todd Minson Tempol improves cutaneous thermal hyperemia through increasing nitric oxide bioavailability in young smokers Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published online March 28, 2014. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00886.2013.

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