Acylcarnitines in Human Heart Failure

What role do circulating acylcarnitines play in the heart failure metabolome? Listen as Guest Editor Sumanth Prabhu (University of Alabama at Birmingham) interviews lead author and Associate Editor Christine Des Rosiers (Universite de Montreal, Montreal Heart Institute), first author Matthieu Ruiz (Universite de Montreal, Montreal Heart Institute), and renowned content expert Heinrich Taegtmeyer (University of Texas Medical School), about the intriguing new study analyzing fatty acid metabolic perturbations in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Des Rosiers and co-authors began their investigations over 10 years ago, and through persistence and new mass spectrometry analytical technologies, pursued a novel mechanism “contributing to the global lipid perturbation in human heart failure.” The work by Ruiz et al was published in the AJP-Heart and Circ Call for Papers on Heart Failure: Novel Therapeutic Pathways Emerging from Basic Science. This special extended podcast discusses the innovative techniques utilized by Des Rosiers, Ruiz and colleagues, along with the passion and tenacity required to understand the alterations in heart failure in long-chain fatty acid metabolism in heterogenous HFrEF patient cohorts. Did the authors find correlations to cardiac structural parameters, along with links between very long chain acylcarnitines and arrhythmias? Listen and learn.

 

Matthieu Ruiz, Francois Labarthe, Annik Fortier, Bertrand Bouchard, Julie Thompson Legault, Virginie Bolduc, Odile Rigal, Jane Chen, Anique Ducharme, Peter A Crawford, Jean-Claude Tardif, Christine Des Rosiers Circulating Acylcarnitine Profile in Human Heart Failure: A Surrogate of Fatty Acid Metabolic Dysregulation in Mitochondria and Beyond Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published July 14, 2017. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00820.2016

00:0000:00

Cardio-postural Blood Pressure Control

How do the cardiac baroreflex and muscle pump systems work together to maintain blood pressure when you are standing? Listen as Associate Editor Robert Hester interviews authors Kouhyar Tavakolian (University of North Dakota) and Andrew Blaber (Simon Fraser University), along with content expert Jerry Collins (Alabama A & M University) about the innovative study by Xu et al. The authors explored the direct neural component between the brain and the muscle pump to help maintain blood pressure during a sit-to-stand transition, as well as a simple standing posture. Employing state-of-the-art analytics such as the wavelet transform coherence method and the convergent cross-mapping method, the authors simultaneously monitored the interrelationships between the human subjects’ cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and balance systems. While the current study investigated young, healthy subjects, are there future implications for helping stroke patients, the elderly, or concussion injury patients? Listen and learn more.

 

Da Xu, Ajay Verma, Amanmeet Garg, Michelle Bruner, Reza Fazel-Rezai, Andrew P. Blaber, Kouhyar Tavakolian Significant role of the cardio-postural interaction in blood pressure regulation during standing Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published September 5, 2017. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00836.2016

00:0000:00

Folic Acid and Exercise Hyperemia in Aging

What are the effects of folic acid on exercise-induced increases in blood flow in healthy older adults? Listen as Associate Editor Nancy Kanagy (University of New Mexico School of Medicine) interviews first author Steven Romero (UT Southwestern Medical Center) and content expert Thomas Barstow (Kansas State University) about the clinical translational study by Romero and co-authors investigating the role of folic acid in mitigating some of the profound changes in arterial vasculature and malperfusion of active skeletal muscle with aging. This innovative study is part of the AJP-Heart and Circulatory Physiology Call for Papers on Mining Natural Products for Cardiovascular Benefits. Is folic acid as a dietary supplement beneficial in preserving exercise capacity in older adults? This may bring new meaning to the adage “eat your spinach,” if doing so ameliorates the loss of nitric oxide in aging. Listen and learn more.

 

Steven A. Romero, Daniel Gagnon, Amy N Adams, Gilbert Moralez, Ken Kouda, Manall F Jaffery, Matthew N. Cramer, Craig G. Crandall Folic Acid Ingestion Improves Skeletal Muscle Blood Flow during Graded Handgrip and Plantar Flexion Exercise in Aged Humans Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published June 30, 2017. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00234.2017

00:0000:00